Bridge the gap

The Fairfax Bridge spanning the 494-foot gap over the Carbon River was built in 1921 and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The one-lane bridge deck is 250 feet above the river and connects to outdoor recreation areas and the North-Western corner of Mt Rainier National Park.

Before the bridge was constructed, the only way to access the coal mining town of Fairfax, WA was by rail or wagon trail from (what is now the Ghost Town of) Melmont. Today the rail bed has been converted into a multi-use trail. (Which is where I took the photo from.)

The details: The details: Fujifilm X-E2 with XF18-55 @18mm. 1/240th @f5.6, ISO 800

 

2017_Oct

October 2017

Mobile Devices

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Squeaky-Scratchy

Found myself in Edmonds the other day and thought I’d go look for herons at a marsh near the beach. Found the Herons, they were all huddling against the cold wind, trying to stay warm. Kinda boring, actually. Walking along the path, I kept hearing the squeaky-scratchy song of a hummingbird. Eventually found this guy up in the top of a nearby tree.

I did later find out that of the four species of hummingbird in Washington, only one of them actually sings. Narrows it down some. The Anna’s Hummingbird is also the only one that winters in Washington. Apparently, they do migrate in the winter, heading for lower elevations, they just don’t go south like the others.

FujiFilm X-E2/XF 55-200 @ 200mm, 1/2900th at f / 4.8, ISO 200

2017_march

March 2017

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Bloomin’ Onion

Between the lavender, onions gone to bloom and other flowers in the yard, the bees have found our backyard.

Shot with a Fujifilm X-E2 and a Nikkor 55mm macro lens. 1/180th sec @ F2.8, ISO 1000.

2016_september

September 2016

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The Doctor Will See You Now

On a hike near Mt Rainier this week, I spotted this dense clump of what I later learned was Jacob’s Ladder flowering on a cliff face. While looking up the flower type, I learned that it is a member of the phlox family of plants. Dr. Phlox happens to be one of my favorite characters from the Star Trek universe.

The details: Fujifilm X-E2/XF18-55mm @37mm, f/4.0, 1/60 sec ISO 640

2016_Aug

August 2016

iPad

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Backyard Safari (Again)

We have a number of pots in the backyard we have used in the past to grow tomatoes. A couple of them have been neglected for a while and one of them is growing a hearty crop of moss. This tiny forest seems to have sprouted and is well on its way to becoming its own thriving ecosystem.

The sprouts in this picture remind me of the rain we’ve had so much of recently – most of it coming down at a similar diagonal.

The details: Fujifilm X-E2, Nikkor 55mm lens, ISO 200, 1/180 second @f2.8

2016_March

March 2016

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That Winter Feeling

This month’s wallpaper is one from the archives, shot on above Narada Falls on Mount Rainier back in August 2013, but seems really fitting for winter in the Pacific Northwest.

Enjoy

2016_jan-2375

February 2016

iPad

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